English

Year 7

Students in Year 7 receive three hours of English each week.

Student aims:

– Read easily, fluently and with good understanding.
– Acquire a wide vocabulary, an understanding of grammar and knowledge of linguistic conventions for reading, writing and spoken language.
– Write clearly, accurately and coherently, adapting language and style for a range of contexts, purposes and audiences.
– Develop confidence in the arts of speaking and listening, making formal presentations, demonstrating to others and participating in debate.

Curriculum:

The Year 7 course covers a range of literary fiction and non-fiction styles, encouraging students to develop independence and precision in their reading and writing skills. A novel and Shakespeare play are studied, along with a collection of poetry. Year 7 students also carry out a range of persuasive and descriptive writing tasks, responding to informative texts.

Year 8

Students in Year 8 receive four hours of English a week.

Student aims:

– Read critically, understanding how language, grammar, text structure and organisational features present meaning.
– Recognise a range of poetic conventions and explore their effects on readers.
– Make critical comparisons across a variety of texts.
– Write accurately, fluently, effectively and at length through engagement with a range of narrative and non-narrative styles.

Curriculum:

– Students read widely across a range of genres, including a novel, poetry collection and Shakespeare play. Year 8 groups are also introduced to a range of non-fiction styles, developing technical skills in analysis and securing the written styles targeted in Year 7.

Year 9

Students in Year 9 receive four hours of English per week.

Student aims:

– Confidently read a wide range of challenging texts, including classic literature and extended non-fiction, from different eras.
– Identify and interpret ideas and information from a variety of sources.
– Make critical comparisons, referring to contexts, themes, characterisation and style.
– Select and use judicious vocabulary, grammar, form and structural features to reflect audience and purpose, using Standard English where appropriate.

Curriculum:

– In Year 9, students begin the GCSE programmes of study for AQA English Language and Literature, covering key examination texts such as ‘A Christmas Carol’ and ‘Macbeth.’ Skills in analysing unseen poetry and non-fiction texts are developed. In Year 9, there is a strong focus on descriptive and narrative writing skills, ensuring a high level of accuracy and precision in extended pieces.

Year 10

Students in Year 10 receive five hours of English per week.

Student aims:

– Read in different ways for different purposes, summarising and synthesising ideas and information, and evaluating their usefulness for particular purposes.
– Explore aspects of plot, characterisation, events and settings, considering the relationships between the writer’s methods and the reader’s responses.
– Select and integrate quotation effectively, for support and emphasis.
– Consolidate knowledge of writing styles, using a wide range of linguistic and organisational features to meet the needs of audience and purpose.

Curriculum:

– In Year 10, students consolidate their understanding on the GCSE programmes of study for AQA English Language and Literature. Students cover a collection of examination poetry and short stories, and revise the set texts, ‘Macbeth’ and ‘A Christmas Carol.’ Skills in analysing unseen literary non-fiction texts are developed. In Year 10, there is a strong focus on enhancing descriptive and narrative writing skills, ensuring a high level of accuracy and precision in extended pieces.

Year 11

Students in Year 11 receive five hours of English per week.

Student aims:

– Read in different ways for different purposes, summarising and synthesising ideas and information, and evaluating their usefulness for particular purposes.
– Explore aspects of plot, characterisation, events and settings, considering the relationships between the writer’s methods and the reader’s responses.
– Select and integrate quotation effectively, for support and emphasis.
– Consolidate knowledge of writing styles, using a wide range of linguistic and organisational features to meet the needs of audience and purpose.

Curriculum:

– In Year 11, students enter the final phase of the GCSE programmes of study for AQA English Language and Literature. Students revise a collection of examination poetry and short stories, as well as the set texts, ‘Macbeth’ and ‘A Christmas Carol.’ Skills in analysing unseen literary non-fiction texts are mastered. In Year 11, there is a strong focus on developing key examination skills, ensuring a high level of accuracy and precision in extended written pieces.

Year 12

During the AS year, students learn about how and why views and perspectives of different kinds are shaped and used in narratives.

They explore how language choices help to shape the representations of different worlds and perspectives in literary fiction and they apply their knowledge to the following:
prose fiction that constructs imaginary worlds;
poetry that constructs a strong sense of personal perspective.

Students learn about the ways in which writers and speakers present narratives about places, beginning with a general focus on broad questions such as:
Why do people tell stories about places?
How do writers and speakers present places, societies, people and events?

Drawing both on their everyday experiences of storytelling in different modes, and on published texts, students learn how language choices help to shape the representations of a place and different perspectives.

Students:
analyse narratives that construct different views of a particular place;
produce re-creative work that seeks to find an absent or underplayed perspective in the original text;
write a critical reflection on the processes and outcomes involved in re-creative work.

Year 13

In Year 13, students learn about how and why stories of different kinds are told. Drawing both on their everyday experiences of storytelling in different modes, and on published texts, students learn how language choices help to shape the representations of different worlds and perspectives.

They apply their knowledge to the following:
narratives that construct different views of a particular place;
prose fiction that constructs imaginary worlds;
poetry that constructs a strong sense of personal perspective.

Students also explore how language choices help to construct ideas of conflict between people, and between people and their societies. Students learn about the ways in which writers and speakers use language, beginning with a general focus on broad questions such as:
How do people interact?
How do people claim power and position others in talk?
How do people express identity?
What communicative strategies do people use when in conflict with others?
How do different groups or individuals make themselves heard?

Finally, students are required to make active connections between a literary text and some non-literary material in an independent investigation. The connections must be based either on a chosen theme or on the idea that particular linguistic strategies and features may occur in the different types of material.