Geography

Year 7

Students in Year 7 receive one hour of geography a week in which we aim for our students to achieve several goals:

1. Develop knowledge of the location of globally significant places including their physical and human characteristics.
2. Understand the processes that give rise to key physical and human geographical
features of the world and how these depend on each other and change over space and time.
3. Be competent in the geographical skills needed to do the following:
– collect, analyse and communicate with a range of data gathered through
experiences of fieldwork that deepen their understanding of geographical
processes
– interpret a range of sources of geographical information, including maps, diagrams,
globes, aerial photographs and Geographical Information Systems (GIS)
– communicate geographical information in a variety of ways, including through
maps, numerical and quantitative skills and writing at length.

Concepts are assessed formally three times a year focusing on seven key skills: knowledge, sequence of formation, structure and classifying, case studies and explanation, atlas/ map skills and interpretation, geographical enquiry and SPaG.

Year 8

Students in Year 8 receive one hour of geography a week which aim to:

1. develop knowledge of the location of globally significant places including their physical and human characteristics.
2. understand the processes that give rise to key physical and human geographical
features of the world, how these depend on each other and change over space and time.
3. are competent in the geographical skills needed to:
– collect, analyse and communicate with a range of data gathered through
experiences of fieldwork that deepen their understanding of geographical
processes
– interpret a range of sources of geographical information, including maps, diagrams,
globes, aerial photographs and Geographical Information Systems (GIS)
– communicate geographical information in a variety of ways, including through
maps, numerical and quantitative skills and writing at length.

Concepts are assessed formally three times a year focusing on: Knowledge, sequence of formation, structure and classifying, case studies and explanation, atlas/ map skills and interpretation, geographical enquiry and SPaG.

Year 9

In year 9 students have two lessons a week. Lessons will be a combination of core and optional topics which will be delivered over a three year course.

The aims of this qualification are that students will develop the ability to think ‘like a geographer’. They will develop four key sklls: the ability to think creatively by posing questions; collect and record appropriate evidence, which will be analysed in class and independently; apply their geographical knowledge, understanding and skills to real world contexts.

Component 1: changing physical and human landscapes.
Core themes:
1, landscapes and physical processes;
2, rural-urban links.

Students will study one of the two topics below:
3, tectonic landscapes and hazards;
4, coastal hazards and their management.

Component 2: environmental and development issues.
Core themes:
5, weather, climate and ecosystems;
6, development and resource issues.

Students will study one of the two topics below:
7, social development issues;
8, environmental challenges.

Component 3: applied fieldwork enquiry.
Learners will be given the opportunity to develop their skills of geographical enquiry through fieldwork. They will undertake two fieldwork enquiries, each in a contrasting environment:

All three components will be assessed separately at the end of Year 11 in three 1 hour 30 minute exams.

Year 10

In year 10 students have two lessons a week. Lessons will be a combination of core and optional topics which will be delivered over a three year course.

The aims of this qualification are that students will develop the ability to think ‘like a geographer’. They will develop the ability to think creatively by posing questions, collecting and recording appropriate evidence, and independently apply their geographical knowledge understanding and skills to real world contexts.

Component 1: changing physical and human landscapes.
Core themes:
1, landscapes and physical processes;
2, rural-urban links.

Students will study one of the two topics below:
3, tectonic landscapes and hazards;
4, coastal hazards and their management.

Component 2: environmental and development issues.
Core themes:
5, weather, climate and ecosystems;
6, development and resource issues.

Students will study one of the two topics below:
7, social development issues;
8, environmental challenges.

Component 3: applied fieldwork enquiry.
Learners will be given the opportunity to develop their skills of geographical enquiry through fieldwork. They will undertake two fieldwork enquiries, each in a contrasting environment:

All three components will be assessed separately at the end of Year 11 in three 1 hour 30 minute exams.

Year 11

Students in Year 11 have two lessons of geography a week which have several aims.

The course develops students’ geographical enquiry and decision making skills through two pieces of controlled assessment, which is worth 25% of their final GCSE grade.
The geographical enquiry will investigate the impact of tourism in Newcastle Upon Tyne, whilst their decision making exercise will explore and evaluate the strategies used to reduce the impacts of earthquakes in Sichuan.

Students will also complete a revision programme covering the following topics:

Paper 1 – 1 hour 45 minutes
Living in an Active Zone
Population
Water
Globalisation
Climate Change
Development

Paper 2 – 1 hour 15 minutes
Tourism
Coasts
Weather and Climate

Both exams take place at the end of Year 11.

Year 13

Students in Year 13 will study three units of work:
-Plate tectonics and associated hazards.
-Eco systems change and challenge
-World cities
These topics are examined in a 2 hour 30 minutes written examination worth 90 marks.
The exam paper consists of structured short and extended questions, plus an essay.

Students also complete a Geographical Issue Evaluation.  This unit gives candidates the opportunity to use their skills of analysis, synthesis and evaluation.
An advance information booklet is pre-released prior to the exam to facilitate candidates’ research into an area which extends from the specification content.
This is examined in a 1 hour 30 minutes written examination worth 60 marks.